Thursday, 15 January 2015

REVIEW || Dorothy Must Die by Danielle Paige

Book Title: Dorothy Must Die (Dorothy Must Die #1)
Author: Danielle Paige
Publisher: HarperCollins, April 1st, 2014
Source: Bought!
Format: Paperback, 452 pages
LinksGoodreads | Amazon | The Book Depository
I didn't ask for any of this. I didn't ask to be some kind of hero. But when your whole life gets swept up by a tornado—taking you with it—you have no choice but to go along, you know? Sure, I've read the books. I've seen the movies. I know the song about the rainbow and the happy little blue birds. But I never expected Oz to look like this. To be a place where Good Witches can't be trusted, Wicked Witches may just be the good guys, and winged monkeys can be executed for acts of rebellion. There's still the yellow brick road, though—but even that's crumbling. What happened? Dorothy. They say she found a way to come back to Oz. They say she seized power and the power went to her head. And now no one is safe. My name is Amy Gumm—and I'm the other girl from Kansas. I've been recruited by the Revolutionary Order of the Wicked. I've been trained to fight. And I have a mission: Remove the Tin Woodman's heart. Steal the Scarecrow's brain. Take the Lion's courage. Then and only then—Dorothy must die!
I think this needs a bit of a preset; Dorothy Must Die was one of my most anticipated reads of 2014 so obviously I bought it as soon as I could and then I found out some, let’s say unsavory things about the book related to Full Fathom Five (link to an article that might help explain this, here) which put me off reading the book. But it had been sitting on my shelf for ages when I got the point where I was like, “Hey, I was really excited for this book, I’m just gonna read this and try not to be biased.” And you know what? I really enjoyed this book!

The entire premise of the book had me enticed, I’ve always had a soft spot for fairytale retellings – especially unique ones, and as a result everything about the book was pretty much up my alley. I mean a book where the heroine we know and love has to be murdered? Yes, please!

The plot of the book, overall, was incredibly inventive and original. Everything flowed well and answered enough questions without info dumping. At moments it felt very much like a showing of queen teen drama at the cinema. I think the thing that really made this work as a cohesive whole was the descriptions; they held everything together and also reinforced the underlying fairytale feeling.

None of the characters were really relatable, nor were any of them rather likeable, but I think that worked in favor of the book because of the darker tale that was being woven. All the basics from the story we knew as children was there but everything was either turned on its head, or shown in a totally new light, and whilst it can make you go “woah, wait, hold the phone” it also makes you go “this is freaking awesome”.

In short, the reading experience was really enjoyable and everything about Dorothy Must Die was original and refreshing but not a lot of the book was very memorable, and Amy (the main character) just got on my nerves a lot, she was also sort of pushed into the role of being a heroine and didn't really act as... accordingly, which just didn't work for me - for those reasons I had to lower the rating. Whilst I don’t agree with anything associated with Full Fathom Five I liked this book for what it was, I gave it a chance and I am definitely looking forward to reading the sequel (The Wicked Will Rise) this year!
Rating = 3 Bookish Birds

1 comment:

  1. I got this out from the library a while ago and ended up returning it unread because I just couldn't be bothered. While the storyline sort of interested me, I somehow couldn't imagine enjoying it (no idea why...). Maybe I'll get it out again one day, but probably not anytime soon.

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